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Comparative demographics

Different countries' population distributions and fertility rates vary. For several years, Japan's demographic status has been characterized as a disaster. For a long time, it has consisted of an aging population of sexless individuals and a decreasing number of children. The overall fertility rate has been gradually but consistently rising (Gerland et al., 234). According to the study, Japan has a total fertility rate of 1.43, which is higher than other countries such as South Korea, which has been its competitor for many years. Japanese women in the age gap of 35-39 are more than those in the age of 30-25 (Coale). It has the world record for the elderly living longer than most places in the world.

The fertility rate of China fell beyond replacement in the 1990s. The China population policy has led to the decrease in fertility rate. In 2010, the total fertility rate in China was 1.19 which is described as below replacement levels (World Health Organization). The aging population is increasing at a high rate in China; the ratio of men to women in is high with the number of men being higher than that of women leading to sex imbalance. The same situation is being experienced in countries like Germany and India where the fertility rate is low with the ration of men to women being high.

The fertility rate in America does not have a significant difference with that of China, India, Japan, and Germany. The U.S recorded a total fertility rate of 1.82, in 2015 which is below the replacement fertility rate (World Health Organization). America has a different gender balance since the ration of women to men is high indicating a difference with China, Japan, Germany, and India (Gerland et al., 237). Census made in 2015 indicated that people under that age of 21 comprised of over a quarter of the entire population, with those over the age of 65 making approximately an eighth of the total population.

Trump's nationalist policy of real politick

In his speech during the united nation General assembly, Donald Trump indicated his approach to the world affairs (Trump, Donald). He declared that in the current world, we are not driven by ideology but by outcomes. He suggested that the rest of the world should be prepared for some realism that is blunt and hard-nosed in his leadership period v. Through most of his speeches, he indicated that the world should be ready for America to embark on it old set of principles and precepts that are based on practical consideration rather than moral or philosophical calculation.

The strategies adopted by Donald Trump in addressing world issues has aided in preserving America's position as the world leader. Though the numerous speeches made by the American President, there have been a clear indication that America is taking the forefront in solving most issues that are currently facing the world. The Trump administration has vividly addressed the North Korea nuclear crisis (Trump, Donald). His government also indicated its readiness to engage in military enforcement in countries that are unlawfully participating in nuclear weapon activities like Iran citing that method of negotiation adopted by Barack Obama one-sided and an embarrassment to the United States. He has also indicated that the U.S is ready to increase its foreign policies approaches of preserving sovereignty. He has shown that his administration is prepared to end unfair socialism regimes and prevent any threat to freedom. He has indicated that the world must be ready to respect the law, the sovereignty of other countries, and other countries culture (Hitch et al.,). Through the different action s and strategies applied by the current U.S administration, it is clear that America still maintains its position as the world reader.

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Work cited

Trump, Donald. "Transcript: Donald Trump’s Foreign Policy Speech." The New York Times 27 (2016).

Hitch, Charles Johnston, and Roland N. McKean. "The economics of defense in the nuclear age." (1960).

Gerland, Patrick, et al. "World population stabilization unlikely this century." Science 346.6206 (2014): 234-237.

World Health Organization. World health statistics 2015. World Health Organization, 2015.

Coale, Ansley Johnson. The decline of fertility in Europe. Princeton University Press, 2017.

September 21, 2021

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