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Feminism in Dracula

Dracula, a Bram Stoker novel, is used as a feminist assessment in a lot of respects. The reading shows how the Victorian period, with its traditions, ideals, and history, was rooted in society. Literary, Feminism addresses the promotion of women's rights on the basis of cultural, economic, and political equality with men. Because of the patriarchal mentality and the environmental issue of women seeking to climb above the world where Bram Stoker might grow up in the 1800s, feminism is constantly illustrated inside Dracula. In the research, we will show the feminist perspective by portraying gender in the text and various attempts of sexual deliverance within the family. In a society where men were seen as the breadwinners, the mother broke all the rules and became the exception. But, to achieve this, Louisa May Alcott presents a fabric family where all the women played a crucial role in the success of the mother. The unity and differences in characters shaped the success of the story.

The ability of the women to take care of themselves without the supervision of men shows that women can do a lot with the aspect of sisterhood at the epitome of it all. It is the same depiction that is represented in the Goblin Market, where devoid of masculinity as the source of cohesion and breadwinner, the women within the book rely on each other for survival and life. Laura and Lizzie, the main characters within the book, are figures of a society that is run by women and their ability to resist the hostility that comes with men shows how strong sisterhood is to them (Rossetti and Rossetti, 4)

Transition from Childhood to Adulthood

However, for sisterhood to be comprehensive and workable, it is shown that women have to transition from being children to grown women. From in an instance of the book, Goblin Market, Laura is a grown woman whose sexual potential is higher compared to when she was a child. As such, she is more aware of the sexual advances that men use to destabilize her relationship with her sister but, she is wary of all that. She is strong to avoid the temptations of men (Rossetti and Rossetti, 4). In this depiction, it is shown that heterosexuality is an assignment of economic roles that are producer based ad merchant based. Laura (Rossetti and Rossetti, 142), used her lock of golden hair as a currency exchange for fruit. In this reference, it is shown that Laura uses part of her body as a commodity of trade which allows the men to determine the terms of purchase placing her in the patriarchal economy. It is a norm for women to do this, and Rossetti opposes this through her character, Lizzie who rescues her sister from the patriarchal goblin men and raises an army to go against the norms of trade. It is an ideal utopia of women which is similar in Little Women as depicted by Louisa May Alcott.

Throughout the book Little Women, Louisa presents a commonality in women based on war, duty, and class. During the war, (Alcott, 57), the women become stronger. It is probably because of the need to depend on each other since there was no father around and this makes them resourceful and reliable. The ambition, capability, complexity, and strength the women depict within the book is enviable. For instance, when Beth passes on, (Alcott, 75), the three sisters pull together and grow closer and value each other. The fierceness that is cultivated within sisterhood goes to prove that women can resiliently work together.

Conclusion: Philosophy of Sisterhood on Women’s Rights Movement

To look at this from an abstract view sisterhood is a term as well as a movement. Its implications for women’s rights movement is that it encourages togetherness and solidity in achieving similar goals. It is a campaign that shapes the right’s crusade since women can take their difference and use them together to accomplish a lot. If this had been the situation in the 1960s, where women of different races and ethnicities, as well as classes, would have joined together in the campaign, a lot would have been achieved (Manson). As such, sisterhood aids in the right’s movement as it promulgates women to put aside societal myths and misconceptions as well as drilled into women that their differences are their reason for not marching in the same fronts. More so, women can use references from such books as educational to comprehending what strength exists in them and how they can manipulate such to their benefit. It is said that women are tasking and involved, but, the Goblin Market and Little Women have shown that such complexities and other factors are the main reason as to why women can be successful in their undertakings. In summary, values of sisterhood are the vortex that can stir up the right’s movement among women by encouraging togetherness, cohesion, and prosperity. Hence, values of sisterhood are necessary for women’s rights advocacy to gain more grounds and more following across all factors.

Work Cited

Alcott, Louisa May. Little Women (1868-9). na, 1989.

Manson, Mark. “What’s the Problem with Feminism?” Mark Manson, 22 June 2017, https://markmanson.net/whats-the-problem-with-feminism.

Nelson, Sophia A. “Time to Put the ‘Sister’ Back in ‘Sisterhood.’” Huffington Post, 11 Dec. 2013, https://www.huffingtonpost.com/sophia-a-nelson/what-is-sisterhood-really_b_4410051.html.

Rossetti, Christina Georgina, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Goblin Market. Phoenix, 1996.

July 24, 2021

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