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Is it true that growing a person's self-esteem improves their school productivity?

The tendency of human beings to have a favorable view of themselves and be optimistic about life can be used to define a person's level of self-esteem. Individuals' self-esteem is based on the concept or picture they form of themselves, which can be traced to most of their interactions with the universe. The person's success at school, at work, or in social situations are examples of experiences with the world. As a result, self-esteem is a crucial aspect of human life, and students must work to improve their self-esteem to do better in school. The following paper will examine whether increasing a person's self-esteem improves their performance in school. The paper will detail how the study was conducted and explain the behavior of interest in the study, provide the formulation of a hypothesis and statistical evidence to prove the theory, using the experimental method and analyzing the results obtained. Finally, the paper will give a conclusion of the study based on the results.

Behavior of Interest

The students' behavior that was investigated during the survey was the performance of two different sets of students in continuous assessment tests during a selected semester. A sociology class of sixty students was divided into two equal groups. The two teams were placed in different classrooms within the same institution and subjected to the different environment during the time of the study. However, the reason for separating the two groups was never revealed to them during the duration of the survey to exclude biases during the study. The two teams were named randomly as "group A" and "group B." Group A was subjected to 10 lessons on how to improve their self-esteem distrusted throughout the semester. The two groups were subjected to ten similar exams distributed over the same period and their performance in the test papers compared.

The lessons were designed so as to boost the self-esteem of the group A class, while the group B was excluded from these lessons. The performances in the continuous assessment tests were supposed to be a measure of productivity at school.

Hypothesis

The paper used a null hypothesis: increasing a person's self-esteem does not improve their performance in class. The purpose of the survey was to prove whether the statement was correct. Therefore, a scientific method of validating the theory was established, and the experiment performed over a period of four months.

Independent Variable

The independent variable for the study was the lessons given to the group A students in the controlled experiment, which were structured to train the students on the practical way to boost the self-esteem. The trainers were competitively selected from a group of known professors in sociology who had been coached on the modalities of the sessions. The continuous assessment tests administered to the two groups of students were timed to come immediately after the training. The students' performance in the evaluation tests was then recorded and compared between the two groups of students

Experimental and Control Group

A sociology class of sixty students was divided into two equal groups and placed in different classrooms. The classes were arbitrarily assigned the letters A and B to distinguish them during the time of the study. Group A was subjected to ten lessons on how to improve their self-esteem, while group B was excluded from these lessons. Instead, they were subjected to various unrelated topics of study ranging from history to religion (Page & Page, 2013, p. 56).

The two groups were then subjected to same assessment tests over the duration of the study, and their average performance in these tests was compared (Page & Page, 2013, p. 34). The results were reported in the form of a table, and conclusions were then deduced. However, the intention of separating the two groups was only known to the researchers throughout the study to minimize chances of bias during the research.

Dependent Variables

The dependent variable during the study was the student's performance in the tests administered immediately after the training on how to improve their self-esteem. The data was collected and recorded in table form. After that, comparisons were made in performance between the two study groups.

Results

The two experimental groups recorded similar average score at the beginning of the research. However, group A students recorded increasing average rating during the time of the research, while group B had an improved average mark throughout the study. The significantly higher score of group A compared to that of group B was an indication of improved performance directly attributable to improved self-esteem (Page & Page, 2013, p. 65).

Controls within the Study

The two study groups were placed in different classrooms within the same institution. Besides, the intention of separating the two groups was only known to the researchers throughout the study to minimize chances of bias during the research (Page & Page, 2013, p. 66). All the other factors including meals, games, subjects of study and examinations were held as constant as possible.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is true that increasing the self-esteem of a person results in improved performance in class. The conclusions can be deduced from the study since the group of students subjected to training on self-esteem recorded high performance.

Reference

Page, R., & Page, T. (2013). Promoting health and emotional well-being in your classroom. Washington: National Academies Press.

August 09, 2021
Category:

Life

Subcategory:

ExperienceMyself

Downloads:

29

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