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Socioeconomic and Diabetes

Diabetic patients have been diagnosed in record numbers all over the world in recent years. Metabolic disorders are linked to this disease. Diabetic complications are the fifth leading cause of death in western communities. Furthermore, psychological and social stress play a role in diabetes complications and deaths. However, both cardiovascular disease and renal complications are associated with death in the elderly.
On the other hand, children's deaths have been linked to acute conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetes harms all human body parts, in addition to death cases; thus, the detrimental complications associated with this disease provide sufficient reason to consider this condition. Consequently, since 1993 World Health Organization (WHO) has initiated a fight against this disease involving various countries across the globe. The success of this campaign aimed to curb the rate of diabetes in the region has been affected by some factors. For instance, Parental socioeconomic status (SES), which in most cases is determined by the education level of the parents and their economic status have an impact on care given to patients suffering from this disease. Besides, SES affects the regulation of metabolic activities in children with diabetes. Serious disabilities like cardiovascular, ocular and renal diseases are among the complications of uncontrolled diabetes. According to Tol et al., (2013), by 2025, diabetes cases across the world will rise by 122% in 2025. In most underdeveloped countries, the number of patients of patients with this condition has increased to 228 million from 84 million which represents 170% increase. This paper will look at the impact of socioeconomic on diabetes.

Impact of Socioeconomic Factors on Diabetes

Tol, A., Baghbanian, A., Mohebbi, B., Shojaeizadeh, D., Azam, K., Shahmirzadi, S. E., & Asfia, A. (2013). Empowerment assessment and influential factors among patients with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, 12(1), 6.

According to Tol (2013), there is a significant relationship between individual's socio-economic status and diabetes. Research has shown that people with lower socioeconomic status are more likely to be affected by this unfavorable health condition due to their inability to sustain a stable health living. As a result, the life-expectancy among individuals in lower socio-economic status is remarkably hostile. Mostly, this issue includes conditions such as cardiovascular diseases which are major causes of deaths in western countries. Cardiovascular diseases result from complications related to the two types of diabetes. Lifestyle behaviors among people living in both socioeconomic statuses are the significant reasons for the vast difference in diabetes in the two regions (Tol et al., 2013). Lifestyle habits like eating unhealthy food, lack of proper physical exercise, and smoking which are due to lack of adequate to lack of sufficient income increases chances of diabetes.

Besides, workplace stress like job instability and lack of job security and stability lead to stress which increases the possibility of one who has diabetes. An individual with diabetes need a regular medical checkup and to feed healthy which is a challenge to individuals with low-income level (Tol et al., 2013). For instance, a cardiovascular complication, which is the condition frequently experienced, requires both resources and supportive strategies. Thus, a diabetic person may need financial stability and also the time to regularly conduct check-ups. These check-ups are done in the healthcare centers or at homes in cases where a person is in a severe condition. Implementation of appropriate strategies by persons with this situation increases their hope, positive expectations, as well as the levels of self-esteem and self-confidence. It enables them to have a positive feeling about their health since it is not predisposed to risks and uncertainties, unlike the patients without such effective strategies. Therefore, such a plan should be deployed by diabetic patients to keep them in a position to regulate their health condition. At the same, social and supportive approaches play a significant role in both managing and altering the diabetic state. Thus, diabetic persons do not only need to have economic resources for their health upkeep. Instead, they also need to have support from their family members and friends to enable them to counter stress or depression.

Jaffiol, C., Thomas, F., Bean, K., Jégo, B., &Danchin, N. (2013). Impact of socioeconomic status on diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: results of a large French survey. Diabetes & Metabolism, 39(1), 56-62.

This is an investigative source that wanted to examine the connection that exists between deprivation and diabetes in most of the individuals in the French nation. The other investigation was to evaluate the effects of deprivation on diabetes after considering various confounding factors. The method that this research adopted took a total of about 32,000 men and 16,000 women (Jaffiol et al., 2013). This group of people was subjected to a health check-up at the “Centre d’InvestigationsPréventivesetCliniques” between the period of between January 2003 and December 2006 to have an in-depth analysis (Jaffiol et al., 2013). The socioeconomic deprivations were found to be those in the 5th quintile of the score distribution.

According to the results, the number of cardiovascular and diabetes markers increased profoundly in deprived regions. In both males and females, deprivation was as result of health conditions of individuals and the type of lifestyles they embraced. In women, body mass index, central obesity, and the metabolic syndrome were attributed to deprivation.The likelihood of suffering from diabetes went up with the deprivation levels. Unhealthy lifestyles and eating habits associated with processed food also contributed to the prevalence of getting diabetes and other threatening health conditions. After considering the age, biological nature, and clinical parameters the chances of getting diabetes among deprived versus non-deprived was 2.5 and 2.2 respectively on a scale of 10 (Jaffiol et al., 2013). Most of the French population that was deprived was linked with deleterious health conditions and ways of life (Jaffiol et al., 2013). In general, the source suggests that the risk of diabetes and other chronic illnesses remains high among the deprived people as compared to non-deprived due to the differences in the way they approach life situations.

Robbins, J. M., Vaccarino, V., Zhang, H., &Kasl, S. V. (2005). Socioeconomic status and diagnosed diabetes incidence. Diabetes research and clinical practice, 68(3), 230-236.

The primary aim of this source was to investigate the close link found between socioeconomic status (SES) and prevalence of diabetes (Robbins et al., 2005). This research aimed at finding out some measures on the socioeconomic status and the risk of diagnosing women and men with diabetes. Epidemiologic study analysis was also conducted in the research. The evaluation took place between the years 1971 and 1992. After the results, it was evident that the incidents of diabetes were inversely related to the level of income in women as compared to men (Robbins et al., 2005). This result was established after measuring the percentages of the level of poverty, education, occupations, and the number of ethnic groups. In general, diabetes prevalence among people with high levels of education was low (Robbins et al., 2005). This relationship may be attributed to the fact that elite people may tend to live conscious and mindful lives. Additionally, individuals in this category are found to be in good earning jobs that can cater for their medical expenses in the event of being diagnosed with diabetes. Other factors were also found to be also among the contributing factors to diabetes prevalence such as body size, family diabetic-history; however, they have minimal effects as compared to lifestyles (Robbins et al., 2005). The incidence of diabetes is associated with the socioeconomic status. Therefore, individuals with good socioeconomic status concerning decent jobs and high levels of education show low prevalence of diabetes and other illnesses because of the knowledge and financial powers they have.

Conclusion

Diabetes cases have increased significantly in the last few decades all over the world. Similarly, both mortality and patients cases associated with the condition are increasing. However, the condition is more frequent among individuals in lower socioeconomic statuses. These individuals lead unhealthy life due to lack of enough financial resources to cater for their needs. For instance, a person with low-income level consumes unbalanced diet and is not in a position to access appropriate facilities for exercise. Also, these people usually have workplace stress due to lack of job stress. Therefore, these factors increase diabetes cases among individuals with low socio-economic status.

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References

Jaffiol, C., Thomas, F., Bean, K., Jégo, B., &Danchin, N. (2013). Impact of socioeconomic status on diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: results of a large French survey. Diabetes & metabolism, 39(1), 56-62.

Robbins, J. M., Vaccarino, V., Zhang, H., &Kasl, S. V. (2005). Socioeconomic status and diagnosed diabetes incidence. Diabetes research and clinical practice, 68(3), 230-236.

Tol, A., Baghbanian, A., Mohebbi, B., Shojaeizadeh, D., Azam, K., Shahmirzadi, S. E., & Asfia, A. (2013). Empowerment assessment and influential factors among patients with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, 12(1), 6.

September 21, 2021

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