Kim Possible Animation

168 views 6 pages ~ 1640 words
Get a Custom Essay Writer Just For You!

Experts in this subject field are ready to write an original essay following your instructions to the dot!

Hire a Writer

Disney world is widely known for their range f show that captures not only the kids’ imaginations but equally appeals to the youthful and adult audience. The entertainments derived from Disney shows appeals best to young generation given the kind of shows that dominates its screens for good part of the time. Most of the shows spewed from Disney shows, such as Kim Possible beams with plenty of graphical and musical appeals to the generation of youthful viewers who appreciate it most.[1]

Kim Possible passes as one of the most successful Disney shows that have dominated the screens for a long time, not counting the massive fans and following it derives from the teenage audience. The enjoyment of the show depends on the character that one chooses to follow, such as the Dementor, Monkey Fist. Just a small chunk of the episodes from this show would come out as dull, with a good number of the shows being entertaining and quite indulging for most of the viewers.[2]

The Kim Possible animation is seen to pass for the kind of production. With the varying character ranges from one episode to another, the series is best fitted to serve the best interest of a teenage generation of viewers, going by the eye-catching costumes that have been used in the plot. For instance, the animation dress code catches the imagination of the viewers with its sense of style and fashion that would not appeal best to the older generations. As described by Dindayal, the ladies wear tight rather appealing clothing that fits the current fashion at the moment.[3]

The hairstyles are impeccable with the attractive and such appealing blend of colours that passes for the teenage generation of viewers.

The Kim Possible animation captures the imagination of the viewers going to the location of the scenes. For instance, the characters fly above the clouds and seem to enjoy themselves as they chase after each other. While the adult audience may not find such scenes as appealing, the teenagers adore such scenes that capture their imaginations giving them the desire and the hope that one day they would fly.[4]

Just as described by Baldwin, Joshua the explosive gadgets that are seen to do nearly everything impossible in the current world are used in the animation to capture the interests and the imagination of the young viewers into speculating exactly what exists out here in the real world that they may not be accustomed to just yet.[5]  The believability of the fighting scenes with the show of powers and might between antagonistic characters make the animation even more of a far thought to the adult audience.

The episodic show runs into the exploration of high school life of Kim where she encounters many typical high school life challenges including boys chasing after her, exams and cheerleading on top of learning to derive. Such encounters are typically what every high school teen would be going through at the stage of their lives similar to Kim’s. As seen in similar show about Phineas and Ferb, these challenges are the standard challenges that every teenager at Kim’s age would encounter in their lives.[6]

Kim Possible would typically get every tween stuck in their seats following similar encounters that they could be going through or rather similar experiences they had in the recent past. The senior primary kids would be interested to find out how Kim handles these high school challenges so that they can borrow a leaf at the time when they will be in the same case in future.

The music in the Kim Possible is very strong, appealing and quite moving. The action-packed scenes require electronic and fast-paced music that accompanies the intensive fight scenes with the struggles and pushes between characters in the scenes. The guitar riffs that open up the dramatic scenes that peat themselves almost throughout the show, the electronic music type just meets what is required for the intensive show that appeals most to the teenagers.[7]

The opening song of the series is quite catchy and appealing to the audience given the rhythmic flow and danceable tunes by the Boy band “Oh Boyz!” which is repeated in many scenes in the movie.

The artists’ songs such as the Boyz group are closely related to the teenage generation of audience. Rather than use the beats and songs by mature singers, the producer opted for the teenage group of singers that the audience closely relate to and teenage audience. The pace and the tempo of the beats in the songs played in the film are also matching kind of show that they accompany to the very best the characterization and the scenery f the episodes.

In season 3 of the Kim Possible series, there is the emergence of special character songs. Borrowing from Hains’ "“Pretty smart,” the voices act very fabulous and appeal best to the group of teen audience.[8] Though unrevealed, the sweet young voices singing in the scenes would entice every teenager to sing along in a close mimic of the seemingly popular series. Just like in the case presented by Malik, the songs are very vibrant and energetic to keep the viewers glued to the episodes to the very end.[9] The vibrancy and energy of the songs best fit into exactly what the young generation would enjoy when watching such shows.

While many series drags too long ending up quite boring to the audience, the Kim Possible did not go that long, ending in season 4. …. Says in his movie review that Such is the style and grit used in the production with pace and anticipation in almost every scene making views looking forward to new episodes and seasons.[10]

Kim Possible remains very popular among the teens accustomed to Disney Shows, by generating a new set of loyal and enthusiastic fans that follow keenly to the last episode. The show receives applause from being very episodic, engaging, captivation and relating to the emerging issues in the teenage life.[11] Whereas much is left to the discretion of the viewers, the show has created a milestone in the animation genre. The series has however been critiqued for being predictable, episodic, repetitive especially in its themes and actions. However, it has been reviewed highly for being very captivating, adventurous and entertaining to many audiences who have followed it from the first episode to the fourth.

Bibliography

Baldwin, Joshua Aaron. "Memories of Children's Cartoons: A Look Into the Relationship Between Nostalgia and Parasocial Relationships in Movie Adaptations." PhD diss., The Florida State University, 2017.

DeCristoforo, Maria Theresa. I need a hero: Reconstructing gender and feminism through Disney's Kim Possible slash fanfiction and the hero/villain dynamic. The University of Texas at San Antonio, 2014. Whitlock, Christine. "Gender Roles and Superpowers: A Content Analysis of Action Cartoons from 1982-2016." (2016).

Fuhrman, Patrick. "Children, Television, and Globalization: A Study of Transnation CTV Distribution and Implications on Children Around the World." (2010).

Hains, R. C. (2007). Inventing the teenage girl: the construction of female identity in Nickelodeon's My Life as a Teenage Robot. Popular Communication, 5(3), 191-213.

Hains, Rebecca C. "“Pretty smart”: Subversive intelligence in girl power cartoons." In Geek chic: Smart women in popular culture, pp. 65-84. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2007.

Hall, Mitchell K. The emergence of rock and roll: Music and the rise of American youth culture. Routledge, 2014.

Hentges, Beth, and Kim Case. "Gender representations on Disney Channel, Cartoon Network, and Nickelodeon broadcasts in the United States." Journal of Children and Media 7, no. 3 (2013): 319-333.

Hunting, Kyra, Adriane Grumbein, and Maria Cahill. "Watch and Learn: Gendered Discrepancies in Educational Messages on Television Channels Targeted at Boys versus Girls." Mass Communication and Society 21, no. 1 (2018): 115-141.

Kristian, George, Megan May McCaw, Rachel Hamilton, Frederik Hartmann, Mark P. Heaton, and Jonathan Wright. "Reviews Film." Film Matters 8, no. 2 (2017): 30-39.

Lemish, Dafna. "How children «s media and merchandizing construct gender." The Routledge Companion to Media & Gender (2013).

Malik, Sonia Mairaj. "Walt Disney and Emotional Intelligence* Sonia Mairaj Malik, Amna Shahid, and Fariha A. Khan Institute of Professional Psychology, Bahria University, Karachi Campus."

Sangster, Thomas, Ashley Tisdale, Dee Bradley Baker, Dan Povenmire, Caroline Rhea, Richard O'Brien, Alyson Stoner et al. "Phineas and Ferb." The Cloris Leachman Handbook-Everything you need to know about Cloris Leachman (2013): 383.

Swain, Dindayal, and Suprava Sahu. "Branding for 21st Century Teenagers." (2007).

[1] DeCristoforo, M. T. (2014). I need a hero: Reconstructing gender and feminism through Disney's Kim Possible slash fanfiction and the hero/villain dynamic

[2]

Ibid 1

[3] Swain, Dindayal, and Suprava Sahu. "Branding for 21st Century Teenagers." (2007).

[4] Fuhrman, Patrick. "Children, Television, and Globalization: A Study of Transnation CTV Distribution and Implications on Children Around the World." (2010).

[5] Baldwin, Joshua Aaron. "Memories of Children's Cartoons: A Look Into the Relationship Between Nostalgia and Parasocial Relationships in Movie Adaptations."

[6] Sangster, Thomas, Ashley Tisdale, Dee Bradley Baker, Dan Povenmire, Caroline Rhea, Richard O'Brien, Alyson Stoner et al. "Phineas and Ferb." The Cloris Leachman Handbook-Everything you need to know about Cloris Leachman (2013): 383.

[7] Hains, R. C. (2007). Inventing the teenage girl: the construction of female identity in Nickelodeon's My Life as a Teenage Robot. Popular Communication, 5(3), 191-213.

[8] Hains, Rebecca C. "“Pretty smart”: Subversive intelligence in girl power cartoons." In Geek chic: Smart women in popular culture, pp. 65-84. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2007.

[9] Malik, Sonia Mairaj. "Walt Disney and Emotional Intelligence* Sonia Mairaj Malik, Amna Shahid, and Fariha A. Khan Institute of Professional Psychology, Bahria University, Karachi Campus."

[10] Kristian, George, Megan May McCaw, Rachel Hamilton, Frederik Hartmann, Mark P. Heaton, and Jonathan Wright. "Reviews Film." Film Matters 8, no. 2 (2017): 30-39.

[11] Hunting, Kyra, Adriane Grumbein, and Maria Cahill. "Watch and Learn: Gendered Discrepancies in Educational Messages on Television Channels Targeted at Boys versus Girls." Mass Communication and Society 21, no. 1 (2018): 115-141

September 25, 2023
Category:

Entertainment

Subcategory:

Movies

Number of pages

6

Number of words

1640

Downloads:

56

This sample could have been used by your fellow student... Get your own unique essay on any topic and submit it by the deadline.

Eliminate the stress of Research and Writing!

Hire one of our experts to create a completely original paper even in 3 hours!

Hire a Pro