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Modern Adoption International & Nation Practice

Modern Adoption International & Nation Practice The reproductive right can be broadly defined as an individual’s right to decide whether they want to have reproductive health and reproduce. This may include and is not limited to a person’s right to plan for their family, whether they wish to use contraceptives or not, freedom of accessing health services related to reproduction, and access to sex education provided in public institutions (Morgan, 136). Due to strict laws of abortion in South Korea, women prefer giving birth, and soon after, they offer their children for adoption instead of bringing them up in their families. More so, the culture in South Korea contributes to stigmatization for single mothers which result in such mothers being unable to make their own decisions in matters of reproductive rights. Also, single mothers receive a lot of pressure from the society including being questioned about their marital status when seeking employment opportunities. Furthermore, some parents have rejected their daughters who have given birth to children before marriage. Such circumstances force young women to opt for giving out their children for adoption instead of bringing them up as a family. Moreover, the government has played a major role not only in enforcement of strict laws but also, it does very little or nothing at all to assist the single mothers in taking care of their children thus the adoption alternative (Jonnes).

Inadequate sex education in public schools contributed to the increase in teenage pregnancies. More so, lack of awareness and education regarding the use of contraceptives was also a major contributor. In this regard, divorced and more single mothers found themselves pregnant. In addition, with no support coming from the government, some family members would give out children for adoption without the mother’s consent. As much as a woman has a right to decide how many children they would like to have and their spacing, some women are naturally unable to have children. Such women find happiness in having a chance of bringing up children even if it means adoption (Jonnes).

In conclusion, reproductive rights should be protected and people allowed making their reproductive decisions without being coerced or discriminated.

Works Cited

Jonnes, M. "Why a Generation of Adoptees Is Returning to South Korea.", The New York Times Magazine, Jan. 2015

Morgan, L. "Reproductive Rights or Reproductive Justice? Lessons from Argentina." Health and Human Rights, 136, 2015.

August 09, 2021
Subcategory:

Identity

Subject area:

AdoptionNation

Downloads:

32

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