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About advertising Colossal Mascara

The paper wraps Colossal Mascara, a beauty product for enhancing eyelashes, has been boosted. Maybelline New York, a multinational beauty company, manufactures it. In an age where natural beauty is scarce, cosmetics manufacturers entice shoppers with vivid and enticing advertisements. According to Bovée et al. (677), most cosmetic customers make purchases based on the appearance of the body copy used in an advertisement. According to this point, most advertisers persuade consumers to purchase these goods by using refined selling strategies. This paper investigates how Maybelline employs ethos, logos, and pathos to draw customers. . It examines how the company uses these three angles of the rhetoric triangle to promote its sales.
Layout Tools
The designer of cosmetic ads uses the principles and elements of art to create an advertisement layout that appeals to the customers including those who carry out window shopping. They also use an image of a mascaraed model and colorful cosmetics to create beauty appeal. As identified by designers, the choice of tints helps in creating memories to those who observe these ads (Pope 2). The mascara flyer distributes hues to create unity in the design. Apparently, the interaction of pink, white, and yellow colors augments readability of the body copy. Similarly, the designer uses the font to distinguish between the narrative copy and the straight-line copy. As Pope highlights, variations in font helps in illustrating the ads subject. Such approach is useful in artworks since the designer categorizes the content according to its relevance (Pope 5). The element of lighting appears in the use of clear colors, an approach that creates a memorable impression to those who observe these advertisements. Light and colors also lead to harmony and proportion in the illustration. Therefore, the interaction of layout tools is substantial in establishing other aspects of advertising.
Target Audience
The use of women models implies that the seller target is the female audience. Pope points out that the use of women’s images has psychological impacts to the female sex. He argues that the designer uses the photograph to create curiosity on the audiences and thus incite their urge to use the product (Pope 6). This marketing strategy makes women pay closer attention to their looks. According to Fowles, the need for people to affiliate with others is the most widespread appeal (Bovée et al. 675). The ads designer aims not only in the selling the pumped up mascara but also gaining new customers. As identified by Pope, “designers distinguish advertising from salesmanship by defining it as mediated persuasion aimed at an audience rather than one-to-one communication with a potential customer” (Pope 2-3). Therefore, the ad uses alliteration to create an impression of the superiority of the product in amplifying eyelashes.
Ethos in Marketing
The advertiser boosts the marketing strategy through sparkling generalities. Such an approach may cause female customers to believe that the cosmetic manufacturer aims to improve their looks. The content of most of the ads shows that advertisers think that the society is cautious towards facial looking. Ethos focuses on how pumped up mascara magnifies eyelashes and improves facial looks. The narrative copy helps those who use these make-up to see that the product under question has no clumps and so different from other mascaras (Emily). The framing techniques help to reduce possible objection of the product by the potential customers. The designers display these techniques through the sub-headline “NEW.” The designers also increase the appealing power of the advertisement by alters the products doing word “pump up” to form the brand name “pumped up.” Similarly, the ads use assonance in the slogans as a ploy of accomplishing economy of words. For instance, the epizeuxis “pumped up” is repeated thrice to create beauty appeal. Ultimately, the ethos applied enables advertisers to integrate society’s beliefs with marketing lines of attack.
Logos in Marketing
Maybelline establishes logos through the display of facts and figures. As identified by the publicist, pumped up mascara can magnify the lashes up to 16 times (Emily). Second, the publicist informs the viewers that the product contains a washable mascara. According to Fowles, logos reveals any hidden fear of a marketing technique (Fowles 10). Fowles argues that the strategy makes the audience feel protected from hazards associated with the products. He also contends that the mascara pumps up the user’s lashes with double collagen. The use of facts and figures is essential in shaping the audiences’ perception (Pope 8). Fowles argues that such methods are likely to increase the demand for cosmetics and makeups because on average, American views approximately 500 advertisements a day (Fowles 1). Similarly, Larock proclaims that humor is vital in facilitating visual language. The seller develops humor through the tricolon “maybe she’s born with it. Maybe its Maybelline” (Larock 472). Therefore, the use of logos plays a vital role in moderating the public skepticism in relations to given cosmetic product.
Conclusion
The Maybelline ads play a significant role in selling the eyelashes product. First, the techniques of the ad design increase the probability of peer approval. As a result, audiences may be convinced to buy the product, either for trial or as a choice. The designer appropriately uses the elements and principles of design in fashioning the rhetoric triangle. The advertising strategy used by Maybelline can appeal to consumers and result in product endorsements. Subsequently, an avant-garde may develop among users thus making the company to obtain a competitive advantage.

Works Cited
“Emily Didonato in Maybelline Pumped Up Colossal Mascara advert (NEW).” Magazine Shoots, magazineshoots.weebly.com/blog/emilydidonato-in-maybelline-pumped-up-colossal-mascara-advert-new. Accessed 14 October 2017.
Bovée, Courtland L et al. Advertising Excellence. 1st ed., New York, Mcgraw-Hill, 1995.
Fowles, Jib. "Advertising’s fifteen basic appeals." Language Awareness, 6th ed. St. Martin’s Press, New York (1994).
Larock, Margaret H., Jacob C. Tressler, and Claude E. Lewis. Mastering Effective English. Copp Clark Pitman, 1980.
Leith, Sam. “Other Men’s Flowers.” The New York Times, 8 Sept. 2012, opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/08/other-mens-flowers/. Accessed 14 October 2017.
Pope, Daniel. "Making sense of advertisements." Consulté le, 9, 2003.

August 18, 2021

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